See What’s Cooking in Kitchen Design

THE ROAD TO KBIS 2020 | Article by houzz PRO

Patterns dancing across natural stone surfaces. International style-setters revealing global trends. Appliances offering smart ways to address wellness. All this and more will be at this year’s KBIS in Las Vegas. Below, designers and an NKBA executive share trends and tips to help you prep — shoe-insole advice included.

Healthy Developments

Wellness will be a big theme at the show, with kitchens joining the growing movement. “Most of my clients love to cook, and additional sizes and configurations in both speed and steam ovens would help me open up options for clients interested in innovative cooking technologies,” says Sarah Robertson, owner of Studio Dearborn in Mamaroneck, New York. But that tech should be seamlessly integrated, says Rebecca Sutton, a designer at Kitchen Design Concepts in Dallas. “People want more behind-the-scenes options than super interactive.” 

A Global Component

Show style this year will stretch beyond national borders. “We’re really increasing the international component,” says Suzie Williford, NKBA’s executive vice president of industry relations and chief strategy officer. “Delegations of designers and manufacturers are coming from all over the world — Germany, the U.K., Jordan, Turkey — which we’re very excited about and intend to keep growing.”

Natural Elements

Expect options pulled from the environment to make a strong showing. “I’m really excited to see biophilic design and to bring the outdoors in,” Sutton says, listing living walls as an example of an idea she’d love to incorporate into a project. Robertson says bold stone surfaces, living finishes and light- and midtone wood cabinetry are natural kitchencentric themes she wants to see at the show.

Bringing Back the Bold

Keep an eye out for bright colors and bold finishes. “I love the options we’re seeing in custom-colored appliances, and I’m hoping for even more customization of appliance handles and knobs,” Robertson says. Sutton adds, “The expansion of maximalism is also bringing back patterns.” As for finishes? “We’re seeing a push to more contemporary,” Williford says. “Black steel on ranges; glass on appliances going from white to a softer gray. And lots and lots of metallic.”

Continuing Education

“I always get a client who doesn’t want what everyone else has,” Sutton says. “So that’s another reason I love going to KBIS, because I can add what I’m seeing to my areas of expertise and show clients new products.” Robertson agrees. “Every discussion with clients is sprinkled with tidbits and information gathered in the field,” she says. An insider tip? “Go to presentations and larger events the first two days, then see exhibitors on Thursday,” since the crowd inevitably thins on the third day, Williford says.

It’s All in the Bag

Since you’ll be logging 15,000-plus steps at the show, comfortable shoes are a must. “Dr. Scholl’s are your new BFFs,” Sutton says. Robertson adds, “Also bring a water bottle you can refill — there are plenty of water fountains — and a portable phone charger or two. Your phone will die otherwise.” Instead of taking collateral, Robertson snaps photos of things she likes, then follows up with vendors postshow to learn more. “I try to do that right away, so I am ready to specify new products,” she says. Williford also tucks a candy bar into her bag, “because you need a little jolt of sugar every once in a while to keep you going,” she says.

3 Kitchen Island Ideas You Haven’t Thought Of

Transitional Kitchen by Marrokal Design & Remodeling
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Other special features. Light green cabinets (matched to Grassland by Sherwin-Williams) with a charcoal glaze on maple. Reclaimed-wood shelves on iron brackets in place of the upper cabinets. Marble countertops with a hand-cut edge detail to resemble the look of when the stone was first quarried.
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Designer secret. “Because the existing window in the corner of the room was so much smaller than the new window, the interior designer decided to basically ignore the window and run the reclaimed-wood open shelving right across that window,” says Gambacorta. “Unconventional, yes, but brilliant.”

“Uh-oh” moment. “When the decision was made to use a 60-inch range (a monster!) on the 13-foot wall, and then the homeowner wanted an extra-large fridge to be on that same wall, it really didn’t leave much room for countertop space on either side of the range,” Gambacorta says. “Since they’re avid cooks, that was a must-have. So, a compromise was made to separate the fridge and the freezer. They cook mostly fresh foods on a daily basis and don’t use a freezer much at all. So, a paneled 30-inch all-refrigerator was placed on the range wall, and a separate 24-inch stainless all-freezer was placed in the pantry with open shelves, giving it the feel of an English larder. This room is totally open to the kitchen area.”
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Cabinets: flush flat panel in custom green paint, Bilotta Collection; hardware: iron; builder: Doug Slater of D.A.S. Custom Builders; project photos: Peter Krupenye
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The subtle differences between quartzite and quartz seem to befuddle everyone from design-savvy clients to industry experts. Some people even use the names interchangeably, which is a huge mistake because it only adds to the confusion. Each material has its pros and cons, so educating yourself on the facts is important, especially if you are considering either of these beauties for your home improvement project. A quartz versus quartzite showdown is well overdue, so let’s dive in.
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A kitchen of any size can feel roomy if you know a few tricks. Sticking to white cabinets and walls is a good start, but there are many other ways to create extra room in your kitchen, or create the illusion of a bigger space than you have, all without sacrificing a sense of personality. Here are 12 of my favorite ways to balance storage, style and long sightlines to get a functional layout with a spacious vibe.

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Islands are workhorses in the kitchen. They offer an additional surface area, apart from the perimeter counter tops, that can be used for food prep, serving or as a place to perch and hang out with family and friends. Those with space-challenged kitchens often think there’s no way they can squeeze in an island, but you’d be surprised at just how compact you can go.
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This article originally appeared on houzz.com